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ICYMI - Advocacy Recap with Committee Chair Paige Stephenson

Posted By Paige Stephenson, Thursday, June 28, 2018

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Dear Allies,

Together SC takes its advocacy responsibilities seriously. You look to us to keep watch and speak up, while always keeping you informed. Today’s letter aims to do just that.

The General Assembly ended its 2-year session in May but will soon return to finalize the budget and to consider unresolved energy bills. Here are a few important updates.

RAFFLE LEGISLATION AMENDED
Thanks to Senator Greg Hembree (Horry/R) who responded to concerns from several nonprofits, the Raffle Act that Together SC helped pass in 2013, was amended to ease restrictions on nonprofit raffles. 

ACTION REQUESTED: As the Raffle Act must be reauthorized before July 2020, we need to hear from you! Share your experiences and other changes needed.

FOIA CASE DECIDED BY SC SUPREME COURT
Another issue at the State House concerned the vulnerability of nonprofits to FOIA requests. Although H.3931 stalled in the House, the SC Supreme Court thoughtfully ruled on May 23 that nonprofits receiving public funds are not automatically subject to the state's Freedom of Information Act. The case arose from a 2013 suit against the Hilton Head-Bluffton Chamber of Commerce, a nonprofit organization. The opinion concluded that "while the Chamber technically expends public funds, we are firmly persuaded that the General Assembly did not intend the Chamber to be considered a public body for FOIA purposes based upon its receipt and expenditure of accommodation tax funds.”

Next year’s plan of work for your advocacy committee includes efforts to ensure fair reporting procedures and consistent standards to hold nonprofits accountable to public entities that grant or contract with nonprofit organizations.

WORKING IN COLLABORATION ON FEDERAL ISSUES
It takes a team to make legislative change happen. Today’s featured photo (above) was taken at a recent meeting with Senator Scott regarding the idea of Universal Charitable Deduction. We thank Clay Grayson for joining Madeleine in presenting our ideas and concerns.

We consider the United Way Association of SC one of our biggest allies and have looked to Naomi Lett as our expert on the opportunities for specific communities provided by Senator Scott’s Opportunity Zone legislation.

We are also proud to work with the National Council of Nonprofits. Last week’s Lobby Day in D.C. focused on five critical federal issues to be addressed, including renewed threats to repeal the Johnson Amendment, that protects nonprofits from partisan politics.

AMPLIFYING YOUR THANKS & SHARING YOUR GREAT WORK
The end of the legislative session is a good time to thank those leaders who worked on your behalf. Keep us in the loop, so we can amplify your praise with an additional “shout out” from Together SC.

We love sharing the great advocacy work you're doing. Today’s 'Collective Voice' section offers some great examples. Thanks to all for sharing.

As always, we look forward to working with you as we advocate together for good.

Your Ally for Good,
Paige Stephenson
Chair, Together SC Public Policy Committee
President and CEO
United Way of the Piedmont

Tags:  Advocacy  Collective Voice  Raffle Act 

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Momentum Growing for IRS to Delay Implementation of New UBIT Rules; Action Needed

Posted By Madeleine McGee, Monday, June 25, 2018

Last week, the National Council of Nonprofits sent a comprehensive and compelling letter to the U.S. Department of Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service requesting delay of the implementation of two new taxes on nonprofits from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. 

The letter identifies dozens of challenges and questions that nonprofits have with the new federal tax law and demands that the IRS delay implementation of the new unrelated business income tax provisions in Section 512(a)(6) and 512(a)(7) of the Internal Revenue Code until one year after the IRS promulgates final regulations on these new laws. 

Section 512(a)(7) imposes a new, counter-intuitive tax on nonprofits' transportation and parking expenses. Section 512(a)(6) requires nonprofits with business income to pay the tax on each separate "trade or business" and prohibits the blending of profits and losses across lines of business. 

Both changes took effect on January 1, 2018 and both are causing significant confusion for many nonprofits because their applicability is unclear without further guidance from the IRS. 

TAKE ACTION: 
Add your voice to the call for relief!

Go to the IRS public comment form and ask  that Treasury and the IRS delay implementing the two new UBIT subsections until one year after Final Rules are promulgated(In the public comment form’s line for Form/Instruction/Publication Number,fill in "Form 990-T".)

Thanks for taking action!

Tags:  Advocacy  IRS  UBIT 

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Together SC Speaks Up for South Carolina Nonprofits on Capitol Hill

Posted By Madeleine McGee, Monday, June 11, 2018

Together SC’s president, Madeleine McGee was in Washington, DC last week,advocating with the National Council of Nonprofits on federal policy issues affecting nonprofits. Here’s a recap of the five key issues discussed with congressional staff:

  • Preserving nonprofit nonpartisanship. Certain members of Congress are trying to repeal or weaken the Johnson Amendment - the provision in Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code that protects nonprofits from being corrupted by partisan politics. Together SC asked our members of Congress to protect nonprofit nonpartisanship by rejecting these efforts, the most recent of which is a rider in a House appropriations bill that could be considered in a committee next week. 

 

  • Delaying implementation of new taxes on tax-exempt nonprofits. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act includes a provision that requires tax-exempt nonprofits to pay unrelated business income tax on the expenses they incur for employee parking and transit benefits. Besides being bad policy, this new tax is causing problems for nonprofits because the IRS hasn't issued guidance to answer a variety of questions about how it applies to particular nonprofit situations. Together SC urged our members of Congress to ask the IRS to delay implementation of this new tax until the IRS issues clear guidance. 

 

  • Creating a universal, non-itemizer charitable deduction. Because the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act doubled the standard deduction, fewer taxpayers will be using the charitable deduction in 2018. Researchers estimate that this will lead to a significant reduction in charitable contributions. Congressman Mark Walker (R-NC) has introduced the Universal Charitable Deduction Act (H.R. 3988) to solve this problem and to provide incentives for low and moderate income individuals and families to give generously to nonprofits.

 

  • Securing a complete and accurate count in the 2020 U.S. Census. Together SC asked our members of Congress to ensure that there is adequate federal funding for the 2020 Census. We also asked them to take action to remove the citizenship question from the Census, which could lead to a significant undercount in South Carolina and other states. The U.S. Department of Commerce recently added this question to the Census even though it hasn't appeared on the Census in the past six decades.

 

  • Preserving the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program. The PROSPER Act, a higher education bill, includes a provision that would end this student loan forgiveness program for people who work for nonprofits or in other public service jobs for 10 years while consistently paying down their student loans. The elimination of this loan forgiveness program could make it harder for nonprofits to attract talented young staff in the future. Together SC asked our members of Congress to reject the PROSPER Act.

 


 

Madeleine McGee pictured with Nick Myers, Senior Counsel and Emily Lavery, Deputy Legislative Assistant for Senator Graham 

 

Tags:  Advocacy  census  DC  nonprofits  Washington 

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Your vote matters! Here’s why...

Posted By Ann Timberlake, Monday, June 11, 2018

Election turnout in South Carolina and in the Nation historically is higher in presidential years. In 2014, 43% of South Carolina's registered voters participated in the November election versus 68% in 2016. Since South Carolina voters do not register by party and are free to choose in which primary they participate, you would think that voters would flock to the polls in June.

You would be wrong. In the last two cycles, more than 700,000 voters skipped voting in the primaries. In 2014, only 16% of registered voters showed up (just over 450,000) and in 2016, under 14% ( just under 420,000) voted.

In South Carolina, almost every state or local district is drawn to favor either the Republican or Democratic candidate ultimately winning the seat. Failing to vote in the primary of your choice is failing to make a difference in choosing who will represent you. And in many cases, there will be no choice offered in November.

This year, in addition to local races, there are competitive gubernatorial contests in both primaries that will impact many issues of interest to our nonprofit missions. If there are runoff elections, you must stay in the same primary in which you voted on June 12th - but also note that voting on June 12th is not a prerequisite for voting in the runoffs on June 26th.

Please take time this year to exercise your right to vote tomorrow, Tuesday, June 12, 2018. Our friends at the League of Women Voters of SC have additional information which can be accessed here and the SC Election Commission will give you your sample ballot.  You can retrieve your sample ballot by following this link.


 About Ann Timberlake

Ann honed her advocacy skills in her early years volunteering in conservation campaigns to protect iconic places in South Carolina like the Congaree Swamp and the Chattooga River. She gained her first political experience in 1978 as a county coordinator for Dick Riley’s gubernatorial campaign.

After working as a sales representative for the Pillsbury Company, Ann opened a full service, neighborhood grocery, The Purple Cow, in downtown Columbia. In 2003, she returned to conservation and political work as the founding executive director of the new Conservation Voters of South Carolina.

Over thirteen years, Ann worked with Board members and donors to grow CVSC from an initial budget of $60,000 to a fully staffed, thriving organization with a budget over $600,000. She made bi-partisanship a trademark for conservation in South Carolina, elevated CVSC as a force in state electoral politics and helped the conservation community unite in support of “common agenda” priorities at the State House.

Ann has served on numerous community boards, including a recent term with the South Carolina Association of Non-profit Organizations. She is a lifelong resident of South Carolina and a graduate of Newcomb College of Tulane University. She and her husband, Ben Gregg, have two adult children.  Read more about what Ann's doing by visiting her website here.

Need more information on South Carolina Elections?  Email Ann here.

Tags:  League of Women Voters of SC  SC Elections  Vote  Voting 

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Raffle Act Amended

Posted By Ann Timberlake, Monday, June 11, 2018
Thanks to the responsiveness of Senator Gregg Hembree (Horry/R) to concerns from local nonprofit organizations, legislation to ease restrictions on nonprofit raffles was adopted and signed by the Governor. 

S.812 allows noncash prizes to be increased from $500 to $950, raises the limit on ticket prices from $100 to $300 and adds a section defining circumstances for volunteers to participate in bingo games. 

We thank Senator Hembree for his leadership and look forward to working with both the House and Senate next year to reauthorize the Raffle Act before its slated expiration on July 1, 2020. 
 
Look for your opportunity to let us know about your experiences with raffles and the Secretary of State's office later this year.

 

Click here to view the bill.


 

About Ann Timberlake

Ann honed her advocacy skills in her early years volunteering in conservation campaigns to protect iconic places in South Carolina like the Congaree Swamp and the Chattooga River. She gained her first political experience in 1978 as a county coordinator for Dick Riley’s gubernatorial campaign.

 

 

After working as a sales representative for the Pillsbury Company, Ann opened a full service, neighborhood grocery, The Purple Cow, in downtown Columbia. In 2003, she returned to conservation and political work as the founding executive director of the new Conservation Voters of South Carolina.

 

Over thirteen years, Ann worked with Board members and donors to grow CVSC from an initial budget of $60,000 to a fully staffed, thriving organization with a budget over $600,000. She made bi-partisanship a trademark for conservation in South Carolina, elevated CVSC as a force in state electoral politics and helped the conservation community unite in support of “common agenda” priorities at the State House.


Ann has served on numerous community boards, including a recent term with the South Carolina Association of Non-profit Organizations. She is a lifelong resident of South Carolina and a graduate of Newcomb College of Tulane University. She and her husband, Ben Gregg, have two adult children.  

Tags:  Advocacy  nonprofits 

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Together SC Board Elections - Ballots Open from April 19 to May 3

Posted By Reid Lehman, Together SC Governance Committee Chair, Monday, April 16, 2018

One of your organization's rights (and responsibilities) as a nonprofit member of Together SC is to vote for a Board of Directors who will effectively lead Together SC in the years ahead.

This year's proposed slate includes five new and one returning members recommended by the Governance Committee to serve on Together SC's Board of Directors.

Together SC's bylaws require the Board to have no more than 21 and no less than 11 members. This year's Board will be in compliance with 15 members. The bylaws also require that the slate be approved by at least 10 percent of nonprofit members. Each active nonprofit member organization has one vote.
 
Ballots will go out by email April 19 to Executive Directors/CEOs (or to the primary contact on the member record if the ED/CEO is not listed). Your ballot must be submitted no later than 5 p.m. on May 3. 

Proposed Slate

Approved by the Board of Directors 03/20/18

Members to Serve a First Term (2018 - 2021)

Darnell Byrd-McPherson

Executive Director

Darlington County First Steps

Hartsville

Darnell has been Executive Director of Darlington County First Steps (DCFS) since 2008. She has expanded both the scope of services and the number of families now served by DCFS by partnering and collaborating with the United Way of Hartsville, Eastern Carolina Community Foundation, and numerous others. She is a licensed social worker, and was in 2017 elected Mayor of Lamar, SC.

Stacey Denaux

Chief Executive Officer

One80 Place

Charleston

 

Stacey never thought she would be running a homeless shelter much less taking one from the brink of closing to serving as a model for homeless services. Today, One80 Place is thriving and leading the way in ending homelessness. With experience in hospitality and the Chamber, Stacey has taken best practices from business and applied them to the nonprofit world. As CEO of One80 Place, Stacey believes that strong nonprofits are critical to the overall economy, not simply charities doing good work.

Monroe Free

Executive Director

Habitat for Humanity Greenville

Greenville

 

Monroe began serving as President and CEO of Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County in January 2009. He has focused his career on helping socially and economically disenfranchised people. He has consulted and worked with dozens of nonprofits throughout the Southeast helping with communications strategy, infrastructure development and fundraising. Since Monroe took helm of HFHGC the organization has experienced tremendous growth in its capacity to serve the families of Greenville County

Carl Humphries

Chief Executive Officer

HopeHealth

Florence

 

Carl began his career in public health in 1994 as a social worker. After four years in direct service practice, he served in a variety of leadership positions both at the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control and HopeHealth, joining HopeHealth in 2000. He has 14 years of experience managing federal grant programs including Housing Opportunity for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA), Ryan White and 330 FQHC programs. Carl is the 2017 honoree for the Fred Sheheen Award for Nonprofit Leadership.

Erika Kirby*

Executive Director

BlueCross BlueShield of SC Foundation

Columbia

 

Erika joined the BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina Foundation in 2013. She supported the development and execution of the Foundation’s vision and mission of improving the health of South Carolinians, particularly for the economically disadvantaged, by developing partnerships and collaborations with local and statewide health organizations, and managing and evaluating grant projects.

JoAnn Turnquist

President

Central Carolina Community Foundation

Columbia

JoAnn joined Central Carolina Community Foundation as President and CEO in 2009 after serving in sales leadership roles for a number of Fortune 500 companies. JoAnn works closely with her board of trustees and staff to develop and implement the vision and strategic direction of the Foundation. She leads a team dedicated to helping individuals, families, businesses and nonprofit organizations establish charitable funds to support causes they care about and make a difference in the Midlands and beyond. JoAnn is a 2013 Riley Diversity Fellow.

 *Ms. Kirby was appointed to the Board at its June 28, 2016 meeting to fill the unexpired term of Scott Graves. She now stands for election to her first full three-year term on the Board.

If you have any questions, please contact Madeleine McGee.

Tags:  Board Governance  Board of Directors  Together SC 

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Columbia College Interns for SC Nonprofits

Posted By Ashley Lauren Fleming, Columbia College, Monday, March 26, 2018

The P.L.A.C.E. Fellows, grantees of the Sisters of Charity Foundation of SC, at Columbia College are looking to connect with some of the fantastic nonprofits around the state.

Each P.L.A.C.E. Fellow (philanthropy, leadership and community engagement) is awarded two internships, paid for through our program, to explore the nonprofit sector, gain real-world experience, and provide valuable and skilled work to those making the biggest impact in our state: You!

P.L.A.C.E. Fellows range in majors, years, and interests. If your organization would benefit from an intern, please visit our website,www.ccplacefellows.com/meet-the-fellows, to learn more about each student and contact Dr. Tamara Burk, Director of the P.L.A.C.E. Fellows Program, at tburk@columbiasc.edu to connect.

 

Ashley Lauren Fleming
Columbia College Class of 2018
P.L.A.C.E. Fellow, Student Coordinator
#WomenLeadSC #fightpovertysc 

Tags:  Columbia College  Internships  Leadership  SC Nonprofits 

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Francis Marion’s Non-Profit Leadership Institute Presents Annual Fred Sheheen Award to Chris Manley

Posted By Shayne Kinloch M.A., Together SC, Monday, March 19, 2018

Francis Marion University’s Fred R. Sheheen Non-Profit Leadership Institute and Together SC honored an upstate businessman with their highest award on March 6 at the 2018 Together SC’s Nonprofit Summit in Hilton Head Island, S.C.

Chris Manley president, executive director and founder of Rebuild Upstate, was presented the Fred R. Sheheen Award for Excellence in Non-Profit Leadership.

The award, named in memory of the late Fred R. Sheheen, the founding director of the Non-Profit Leadership Institute, is presented annually to a graduate of FMU’s Non-Profit Leadership Institute or a member of Together SC (formerly SCANPO) who has excelled in the management of their establishment through organization and resource development.

Manley’s Rebuild Upstate is a nonprofit organization that is focused on performing repairs to substandard housing occupied by children, the elderly and those with disabilities. Rebuild Upstate’s goal is to ensure their clients are able to remain in their own homes, free from unsafe conditions.

John Boyanoski, a member of the Rebuild Upstate Board of Directors, says Manley’s work has been immeasurably beneficial to not just the recipients of Rebuild Upstate’s generosity, but the entire Upstate region.

“As a direct and proximate consequence of Chris’ steady guidance, Rebuild Upstate has performed thousands of repairs to homes in Greenville, Pickens, Anderson, and Oconee Counties,” Boyanoski says. “This work, in turn, has enabled thousands of families to remain together in their own homes and, perhaps most importantly, this work has allowed those families to regain pride in their homes, and to transform those structures from an imperfect shelter into a source of personal dignity.”

Manley was presented with a not just the Fred R. Sheheen Award for Excellence in Non-Profit Leadership, but a $500 award, recognition through various communications across the state.

 

Francis Marion’s Non-Profit Leadership Institute presents annual award

Tags:  Fred Sheheen  Nonprofit Summit  Together SC 

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A Special Summit Message from Darrin Goss, Sr.

Posted By Darrin Goss, Sr. , Monday, March 12, 2018

It was inspirational to convene, collaborate and connect with so many Allies for Good this week at the TogetherSC #NPSummit18. We’re creating unstoppable momentum, and the positive energy is palpable.

I want to thank Madeleine and everyone who worked to bring together leaders from all walks of life, from South Carolina’s small towns and big cities, and from organizations of every shape and size. I’m impressed by the diversity of backgrounds and thought we have leading the nonprofit community in our state.

My Tuesday morning plenary, Creating a Culture of Courage, stressed the importance of our sector having the courage to conduct critical conversations about the greatest challenges affecting our diverse communities. I opened with imaginary newspaper headlines showcasing “What IF?” scenarios of South Carolina leading the nation in education, equity, infrastructure, and economic opportunity. 

But what if my “What IF?” headlines became a reality? As leaders across the state, we must embrace these aspirations. They don’t have to be mere dreams. We can actually make them happen. We will get there if we start by building our own internal capacity and credibility, and by turning outward to listen, learn, and discover what we don’t yet know. 

This listening and learning needs to happen in the communities in which we live, and in the communities of the people we serve. We have a problem with structural inequity within our communities. The courage I talk about is the courage to build credibility by speaking this truth. When we can understand that equality—people all starting from the same place—is not our reality, we can begin the work to achieve what I call real equity. Together we can get at the policies that perpetuate the problems, and reduce the barriers that have been keeping people behind for generations.

Coastal Community Foundation took an important step on our journey two years ago by committing to a policy of equity and inclusion. I consider it the bedrock of our work, and I’m witnessing it becoming a key element of our everyday practice. We are challenging ourselves to ensure equitable outcomes, from our board and staff to our grantees and vendors. 

This is just one example of how we could all be working to transform our dreams of a better (the best) South Carolina into reality. Our diverse organizations and the diverse communities we serve share the same hopes, dreams, and aspirations.

As I said in my speech, let’s not settle for a South Carolina at the bottom. Let’s "instigate" for a South Carolina at the top. Let’s come Together…SC!

 

Tags:  2018 SC Nonprofit Summit  Coastal Community Foundation  Darrin Goss Sr.  Nonprofit Summit 

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Fred R. Sheheen Award for Excellence in Non-Profit Leadership

Posted By Cheri Richardson , Monday, February 5, 2018


In 2017, the Award for Nonprofit Leadership was named in the memory of Fred Sheheen, founder of the Non-Profit Leadership Institute at Francis Marin University.

The purpose of the leadership award is to recognize a graduate of Fred R. Sheheen Non-Profit Leadership Institute at Francis Marion University or a Together SC member who has excelled in the management of their organization through organizational and resource development. This award is sponsored by the Fred R. Sheheen Non-Profit Leadership Institute at Francis Marion University.

Recipients receive:

  • $500 cash award given by Francis Marion University.
  • A distinguished award to proudly display in their office
  • Registration for the award recipient at Together SC’s SC Nonprofit Summit
  • Recognition through NPLI website and newsletter(s)
  • Statewide recognition through Together SC communications with nonprofit, business, and foundation sectors
  • Local recognition through the organization’s newspaper media outlets

The 2018 Fred R. Sheheen Award for Excellence in Non-Profit Leadership will be presented in Hilton Head at the 2018 SC Nonprofit Summit.

Deadline for submission:  Friday, February 9, 2018

Apply for the 2018 Fred R. Sheheen Award for Excellence in Nonprofit Leadership today!

Click Here for Submission Form and Instructions

For questions about nominations, please contact Cheri Richardson with the Francis Marion University Education Foundation office by emailing  crichardson@fmarion.edu or calling 843-661-1199. 

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  LeadershipSC  Nonprofit Excellence Award  Nonprofit Leadership  Nonprofit Summit  Together SC 

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